The next topic on Chris Martenson’s What Should I Do? list is Food Storage.

He makes an interesting statement for which there is no reference so I can’t endorse or refute it: “Once upon a time, there was a person in every community whose job it was to ensure that sufficient food stocks existed in their town to carry the people through the winter.  Their job was to travel to all the farms and granaries, total up all the food, divide by the number of people in town, and assess whether the community would be able to make it through the winter.  In fact, it is only very recently that we have lost this function, and today most people think it rather odd to even wonder about food security.”

Since we have no food police to make certain you have supplies on hand, you’re on your own. Clearly, having some long term food storage is important. In his blog this week Dr. Mark Sircus has some alarming things to report about impending food shortages.

Storing food isn’t that complicated. You start by buying extra. Canned food is easy to accumulate and store. Begin with a case of chili or refried beans. Buy some cases of canned fruit and tomatoes. Consider adding some of the dehydrated foods offered by stores like Costco. If you want to get really serious and put up a years supply of staples buy some food grade buckets, some mylar bags, a Food Saver, oxygen aborbers, fifty pound bags of stuff and get to work packaging them up. I detailed how we did it here.

It’s been a couple years now since we did these buckets and have opened a couple and eaten the stuff and it’s fine, even the flour that we put up. You can feed yourself for a long time on rice and beans. It helps, I think, to be familiar with how to use polenta, brown rice, couscous, bulgar, quinoa and other odd grains to provide a bit of variety.

While you are building up food storage think about those other necessities to have on hand. Some suggestions: toilet paper, baking soda (an extremely useful item for a lot of reasons), laundry and other soaps, vinegars, cooking oil, salt, sugar (I try not to eat it but it’s useful for preserving some foods and I’m told it good for packing wounds), a big first aid kit, batteries. The list goes on and on.

Storing food builds some resilience into your life.

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3 Responses to “Food Storage”

  1. Pamela Miller says:

    There are a lot of good info video’s on UTube about food storage.

  2. [...] Nearby Transition Lummi Island outside Seattle offers good advice to all Transitioners inspired by peak oiler Chris Martenson’s Crash Course: Storing food isn’t that complicated. You start by buying extra. Canned food is easy to accumulate and store. Begin with a case of chili or refried beans. Buy some cases of canned fruit and tomatoes. Consider adding some of the dehydrated foods offered by stores like Costco. If you want to get really serious and put up a years supply of staples buy some food grade buckets, some mylar bags, a Food Saver, oxygen aborbers, fifty pound bags of stuff and get to work packaging them up. I detailed how we did it here. [...]

  3. [...] Nearby Transition Lummi Island outside Seattle offers good advice to all Transitioners inspired by peak oiler Chris Martenson’s Crash Course: Storing food isn’t that complicated. You start by buying extra. Canned food is easy to accumulate and store. Begin with a case of chili or refried beans. Buy some cases of canned fruit and tomatoes. Consider adding some of the dehydrated foods offered by stores like Costco. If you want to get really serious and put up a years supply of staples buy some food grade buckets, some mylar bags, a Food Saver, oxygen aborbers, fifty pound bags of stuff and get to work packaging them up. I detailed how we did it here. [...]

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